The Jennie Wade House, Gettysburg, PA

It should be of no surprise to anyone that I wanted to visit Gettysburg, PA. It is said to be the most haunted city in all of America and my data collected from the Jennie Wade House at 548 Baltimore Street proves that the spirits that haunt the city are all over.

Jennie Wade’s Brief Story

I took the suggestion from staff in the Jennie Wade Museum Gift Shop for a few books. One them being “Jennie Wade of Gettysburg” by Cindy L. Small, I found it a quick, detailed account of what happened that fateful day for Jennie and some of the contacts she had.

For starters, let’s start with her name. Jennie was a nickname that derived from Ginnie which derived from Virginia. And Virginia was her middle name with her first being Mary. Interesting enough, her nickname provides us with a bit of her personality and gives the museum a bit more flare. The name Jennie sounds and looks a bit more wholesome than Virginia, and endearing and comforting to Union soldiers is exactly what she was. I’m an onlooker for people’s actions, and Jennie’s actions tell me she had a kind soul and big heart.

“Ghost Adventures” interview Zak Bagans with Joe Svehla, manager of the Jennie Wade House.

Although she could’ve avoided and ignored the constant door knocking from Union soldiers for food and water, she instead gave them what she could in fresh baked bread and pails of water. When she ran out and was preparing more yeast, she would tell the soldiers when they could expect their next meal. Bringing pails of water to these soldiers was a risk all on its own as she took the pails of water out to them, a brave act indeed with the wages of war nearby.

The table where Jennie was preparing breakfast when she was shot. Photo by April McGirr

Jennie was only 20 years old in 1863 showing enough courage to help take care of family and serve soldiers in their time of need.

Ironically enough, the house in which Jennie was shot and killed wasn’t even her own. Her sister, Georgia, had a baby a few days prior and their mother was already helping to tend to the baby at Georgia’s home. Jennie and her brothers joined them soon after the battle began. The Jennie Wade House is named after Jennie, but it was her sister’s home.

Jennie was preparing yeast when a Confederate soldier missed his target and the bullet went through two doors to strike Jennie in the back forcing its way to her heart, killing her instantly.

I also want to point out that the house was what we know as a duplex: Georgia and her family on one side and the McClain family on the other. The McClains, Mr. John Isaac McClain and Mrs. Catherine McClain had four children.

Enlarged hole by Union soldiers so they could move Jennie’s body and her family safely to the McClain side of the home. Photo by April McGirr

Upstairs, there is an opening in the wall that was broadened by Union soldiers. The original hole in the wall was caused by an artillery shell that passed through the roof and into the wall the day before Jennie was shot. Through this enlarged opening, Jennie’s body was carried through to get to the other side of the home (the McClain side) and then down to the basement.

There are plenty more details that go into this story, like an alleged lover/fiance and a message that was never delivered to Jennie. If these details were partial to my investigation here, I would certainly lay them out for you. However, nothing of consequence in my investigation told me anything about this fiance or any message detail.

I urge you to read Small’s book before conducting your own investigation and/or just visiting the museum. “Jennie Wade of Gettysburg”

Other Investigations of the Jennie Wade House

I am sure there are countless investigations of the Jennie Wade House, but popularity of TV shows such as Ghost Adventures and Ghost Labs have documented their findings. Such claims that accompany those of the popular television documentaries are that of orbs floating, people getting touched, a full apparition of a boy, and countless EVP’s.

Joe Svehla, manager of the Jennie Wade Museum tells his tale of a haunting.

My Investigation of the Jennie Wade House

Much like my investigation of the Flight 93 Memorial near Shanksville, PA, I used the same equipment:

  • Thermal imaging camera in my side cargo pocket.
  • SBox Ghost Scanner by GhostStop on silent.
  • Digital spirit box on my cell phone.
  • K-II EMF Meter

Word of note: The thermal imaging video taken inside the actual home has been lost. Upon review directly after our departure, I did happen to capture a very cold figure crouching in the upstairs bedrooms by the wall opening.

The bed in the basement of the Jennie Wade House where she was kept until the battle of Gettysburg was over. Photo by April McGirr

As always, when reviewing the SBox Ghost Scanner file, I write down everything I hear with a timestamp. You can find the entire audio and my list of findings below. But I do want to point out the terms heard that make the most sense.

  • 00:23 “Killed me”
  • 02:10 (disembodied)
  • 02:13 (disembodied)
  • 03:13 “I want”
  • 03:16 “to talk to your kids”
  • 06:22 “the Nation”
  • 07:25 “Nancy”
  • 08:29 “Central”
  • 09:31 “Open one”
  • 13:42 “Who is that?”
  • 17:22 (odd sounds)
  • 22:42 “I hear you”

Most of these terms are pretty obvious, but I want to focus on two in particular: “Nancy” and “Central”.

Nancy Weikart ran a boarding house in the “heart” (or central) of downtown Gettysburg. The following article tells of another gunshot wound from Amos Whetstone. He ended up on the porch of Weikart where his wound was bandaged. At the wrong place during this battle, I find that it’s no coincidence that “Nancy” and “Central” were clues for me to dive into this Gettysburg Battle story as well. “Remembering Gettysburg”

From the Digital Spirit Box

The following list is from the digital spirit box used on my cell phone.

08/19/2020 – 17:32: CHILDREN (.49) Another reference to kids, see marker 03:16 from SBox above.
08/19/2020 – 17:34: RESULT (.48)
08/19/2020 – 17:36: RECALL (.47)
08/19/2020 – 17:37: GRACE (.47)
08/19/2020 – 17:39: POLICY (.46)
08/19/2020 – 17:39: MR (.53)
08/19/2020 – 17:39: BARN (.54)
08/19/2020 – 17:40: CLUSTER (.49)
08/19/2020 – 17:42: BOIL (.46)
08/19/2020 – 17:44: BLOW (.47)
08/19/2020 – 17:46: DIAGNOSIS (.46)
08/19/2020 – 17:46: RECESSION (.59)
08/19/2020 – 17:48: ASLEEP (.48) I was near the bed in the McClain bedroom where I also had strong EMF spikes.
08/19/2020 – 17:50: SOLSTICE (.47)
08/19/2020 – 17:50: DIVINE (.53)
08/19/2020 – 17:51: LET ME OUT (.51) Near the opening in the wall.
08/19/2020 – 17:53: POLITICAL (.47)
08/19/2020 – 17:54: CELEBRATION (.55)
“Political” & “Celebration” could be one phrase describing the battle.
08/19/2020 – 17:56: HAIR (.46) There are accounts from tour guides that there are hair tugs while in the Jennie Wade House.
08/19/2020 – 17:57: ANNOUNCEMENT (.46)
08/19/2020 – 18:00: NATURAL (.45)
08/19/2020 – 18:01: BEFORE (.45)

I also took a thermal imaging video while I was in the gift shop of the museum, but found no abnormalities in the video.

Moving forward, I plan on giving you, the reader the entire audio files of data to verify my findings. In the event you hear/see something that was not notated, please feel free to email me your findings/interpretations to storiesinthecemetery@gmail.com, and put the case in the subject line. I will be more than happy to correct or add any of the evidence.

Here is the full SBox Ghost Scanner Audio for your review with my full findings below it.

  • 00:08 “Today”
  • 00:23 “Killed Me”
  • 00:38 “the condition”
  • 01:26 “twenty percent”
  • 01:37 “the body”
  • 01:42 “admit”
  • 02:10 (disembodied)
  • 02:13 (disembodied)
  • 02:28 “let me start it”
  • 02:42 “I want”
  • 02:44 “it was when”
  • 03:06 “what I knew”
  • 03:13 “I want”
  • 03:16 “to talk to your kids”
  • 04:05 “let me show”
  • 04:21 “feel like”
  • 06:22 “the Nation”
  • 07:25 “Nancy”
  • 08:29 “central”
  • 09:00 “here”
  • 09:31 “open one”
  • 10:04 “already”
  • 12:11 “I saw”
  • 12:39 “ready ID”
  • 13:11 “Justine”
  • 13:42 “Who is that?”
  • 14:17 “walk on”
  • 14:49 “Don’t”
  • 15:17 “let us”
  • 16:19 “recognize”
  • 17:11 “tell you”
  • 17:22 (odd sounds)
  • 22:02 “behind you”
  • 22:42 “I hear you”

More Than a Blog

If you’d like to check out the podcast episode for this post, you can listen below. This will be Episode 38 of the Stories in the Cemetery podcast.

E38: The Jennie Wade House, Gettysburg, PA Stories in the Cemetery

Head over to http://www.nicholasmcgirr.com to view the blog post with bonus sections. References used for this podcast episode: Find A Grave. (n.d.). Jennie Wade. Retrieved  from Find a Grave: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/1064/jennie-wade Joe’s Ghost. (2011). Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.  Retrieved from https://youtu.be/1-3govRv8nE Serfass, D. R. (2014, June 27). Remembering  Gettysburg. Retrieved from Time News Online:  https://www.tnonline.com/20140627/remembering-gettysburg/ Small, C. L. (2018). Jennie Wade of Gettysburg. Gettysburg: Gettysburg Publishing. Svehla, J. (2010, September 17). Ghost Adventures.  (Z. Bagan, Interviewer) Retrieved from https://youtu.be/vq3R_x_moCs The Jennie Wade House Museum. (n.d.). The Jennie Wade  House Self-Guided Tour Pamphlet. The Jennie Wade House. Women Behind These Walls. (n.d.). Women Behind  These Walls Pamphlet. Retrieved from YWCA Gettysburg:  https://www.ywcagettysburg.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/WBTW-brochure-2015.pdf — Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/storiesinthecemetery/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/storiesinthecemetery/support
  1. E38: The Jennie Wade House, Gettysburg, PA
  2. E37: The Flight 93 National Memorial
  3. E36: The SBox Ghost Scanner by Ghost Stop
  4. E35: Homage to Vincent Price
  5. E34: Three books to study Cartomancy

You can also take a ghost hunting tour with me if you are ever in the Charleston, SC area. My guests use my tools: thermal imaging camera, spirit boxes, laser grids and more. What’s even better is you get the data back the next morning for your review. To learn more, head over www.charlestoncavaliertours.com for details. (Ticket pricing may vary depending on season).

References Used for This Blog Post and Podcast Episode

This is a very short list of references only to verify data taken while visiting the Jennie Wade House. I encourage you to further investigate with the plentiful resources that can be found both online and in print.

SBox Ghost Box & Recorder by GhostStop

I’ve been using the SBox Ghost Box & Recorder for a couple of months now. It is now a tool used and appreciated by my guest ghost hunters on the Stories in the Cemetery Interactive Ghost Hunting Experiences in downtown Charleston, SC. I’d like to cover a few features of this device and explain why I use it.

SBox Aesthetic Features

This device was designed by the team at GhostStop.com. You can find their logos and website all over this page. But with that in mind, they kept the ghost hunter in mind when creating this device. When compared to the popular SB-7, the SBox is both affordable and useful.

For starters, the built in speaker is loud! There are no attachments bulking off the edges of the black and red design. The digital face on the screen is easy to read and shows battery life. The battery is also rechargeable, so there’s no carrying of extra batteries for multiple ghost hunts or road trips. The tool simply plugs into any micro USB cable and voila, you’re charging. That’s the cell phone charger you’ve been using for your old phone, in case you were wondering, not the new USB-C types.

It’s compact and has a leather type wallet that doesn’t allow accidental button pushes. The wallet is sold separately of course, but I am highly recommending it. The power is controlled by a toggle button and it sits on top of the device away from all the other controls. I can’t tell you how many times my SB-7 got jostled around my gig bag and it gets turned on by accident while I’m driving away from my location.

And last but not least, there’s a flashlight on the device that works even when the power toggle button is in “OFF” mode. It’s not the brightest of bulbs, but hey, sometimes any light is good!

Overall, the functionality of aesthetics and thought process is evident in the gadget. Let’s talk about it’s main functions.

Recording with the SBox

With a micro-SD card inserted, the tool has the capability to record your spirit box sessions. There are highlights and pitfalls and once you get the gist of the rules, this is a great device.

I should first say, that when the device is recording a sweep, outside noises and voices cannot be heard. For my ghost hunts with teams of people, this can be a good thing or a bad thing. I’m already recording the entire audio for the team to review later, so it’s not necessary to record outside audio through the SBox, but it would be great to hear questions through the recording and then the answer through the sweep. A “PAUSE SWEEP” button would be very useful here.

However, listening to a synced MP3 file with the natural audio from a separate recorder is not all that difficult. The morning after a ghost hunt, I can listen to both toggling the file until I find what my guest heard.

The other great feature about the recordings is that no matter where your volume turnstile is located (either loud or on mute), the recording comes out in one even level. This is fantastic because during my ghost hunts, we often stop for me to tell the data of a specific location and I ask that spirit boxes are turned down so they can hear, all the while, the SBox is still recording. That’s a wonderful feature to have.

MP3 Files

I have really had only one pitfall with the SBox and that deals with the files. Because I do 6-12 ghost hunts a week, I need to label the files. The files do not give me a date/timestamp of when it was taken and is assigned a number. Renaming the file isn’t the issue, losing the assigned number, but making sure I have the correct file for each tour can be a bit of a struggle. Granted, I’m uploading this files to this website the very next morning but if an amateur ghost hunter toggles the power button several times throughout the tour, then I have to remember how many files that ghost hunt gets. It’s not necessarily difficult, but it does make my job easier when there are the same number of files as per tours that evening.

Overview of features video by Ghost Stop.

I recently took the SBox to my paranormal vacation in Pennsylvania where I visited Gettysburg (3x locations), Falling Waters, and the Flight 93 Memorial in Shanksville. Most of the places I went to “investigate” did not allow recordings of any kind. This is where the SBox was set to record and went into my pocket discreetly. Once back at my computer, I labeled each MP3 file according to my locations each day for review later. I tested each file to make sure they recorded properly and the length of time and put them aside for when I do the full research for each location.

Summary

All in all, I give this gadget a 9/10. For the outside functionality and the recording side of the device, this tool is an absolute must have for my tours. The designers were thoughtful in creating a device that not only works with sweeping technology, allowing us to review the data later with the recording function, but they also gave us a safety light in case our dark spaces turn darker.

To my knowledge, you can only get this great little device from GhostStop’s website. It typically runs $89.95, but often goes on sale. Click the banner below to check it out.

More than just a blog…

This will be episode 36 of the Stories in the Cemetery podcast.

E38: The Jennie Wade House, Gettysburg, PA Stories in the Cemetery

Head over to http://www.nicholasmcgirr.com to view the blog post with bonus sections. References used for this podcast episode: Find A Grave. (n.d.). Jennie Wade. Retrieved  from Find a Grave: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/1064/jennie-wade Joe’s Ghost. (2011). Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.  Retrieved from https://youtu.be/1-3govRv8nE Serfass, D. R. (2014, June 27). Remembering  Gettysburg. Retrieved from Time News Online:  https://www.tnonline.com/20140627/remembering-gettysburg/ Small, C. L. (2018). Jennie Wade of Gettysburg. Gettysburg: Gettysburg Publishing. Svehla, J. (2010, September 17). Ghost Adventures.  (Z. Bagan, Interviewer) Retrieved from https://youtu.be/vq3R_x_moCs The Jennie Wade House Museum. (n.d.). The Jennie Wade  House Self-Guided Tour Pamphlet. The Jennie Wade House. Women Behind These Walls. (n.d.). Women Behind  These Walls Pamphlet. Retrieved from YWCA Gettysburg:  https://www.ywcagettysburg.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/WBTW-brochure-2015.pdf — Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/storiesinthecemetery/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/storiesinthecemetery/support
  1. E38: The Jennie Wade House, Gettysburg, PA
  2. E37: The Flight 93 National Memorial
  3. E36: The SBox Ghost Scanner by Ghost Stop
  4. E35: Homage to Vincent Price
  5. E34: Three books to study Cartomancy

Let’s go Ghost Hunting!

If you are traveling to Charleston, SC or you live in the area, let’s go ghost hunting! Stories in the Cemetery is also an Interactive Ghost Hunting Experience. This is not your average walking ghost tour. You will be using tools of the trade including the SBox Ghost Box as mentioned in the above review.

Other tools used during the ghost hunt are the FLIR thermal imaging camera, SB-7 spirit box, laser grids and more. What’s even better than getting to use all these gadgets? You get the link to your specific ghost hunt’s data to further your investigation. I give you a quick analysis of what I found in the data as a collective and then you get to review it over and over again at your leisure.

Here is the August Tour Evidence Page: August 2020.

Tickets sell quickly and often book out on the weekends, but you can follow Stories in the Cemetery on Facebook to find out more, or you can just book your tickets at http://www.charlestoncavaliertours.com.

Called out at the Old Exchange and Provost Dungeon

Visiting this giant piece of Charleston’s history is a must-do for any local as well as any travelers coming through Charleston. I’ve been through the Old Exchange and Provost Dungeon on several tours, learning about the history throughout the building and piecing the clues together for hauntings around the city. However, going back to 1771 when the building was constructed, allows any visitor to see the connection Charleston had to our great nation.

The History

Constructed in 1771, the Old Exchange and Provost Dungeon has been used as several different operations including a mercantile exchange, a post office, and military headquarters to name a few. These different operations show the exchange of hands this building has undergone since the birth of this Georgian-Palladian structure.

Another fascinating piece to this building is that you can see a sliver of the original wall of Charles Town through the Provost Dungeon.

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The original wall of Charles Town. Photo by Nicholas McGirr

The dungeon was said to have housed criminals of all sorts; men, women, pirates, and tea. Yes, I said tea, because, during the Charleston Tea Party, this is where the tea was held to keep it away from the British hidden behind a wall that no longer exists.

The Old Exchange is also one of the four locations where the Declaration of Independence was ratified, an immense part of our American and Charlestonian history. The rooms above the dungeon glorify this moment with the artifacts and staff dressed in period costumes.

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Know that through this article, I am not even touching the surface of the history of this building. I am not claiming to be an expert by any means and I encourage you history buffs to put this building on your bucket list to enjoy for yourselves. For this article, I am focused on basic history to explore any proclaimed paranormal activity.

The Paranormal Claims

There are plenty of paranormal claims to the Old Exchange and Provost Dungeon including guests getting tugged, pushed or clothing pulled. Others claim that the period costumes of the staff make it confusing for the spotting of spirits because they, too, are in period dressings of their own time. Some staff claim that “staff members” are seen walking into walls from time to time.

20200212_125407
Photo by Nicholas McGirr

In February of 2019, a paranormal investigation was led by Grant Wilson from “Ghost Hunters”, Chad Lindbert from “Ghost Stalkers” and Carol Cleveland from YouTube’s “Haunt ME”. I could not find the evidence from this ghost hunt, but tickets ran about $185 for a meet and greet with the celebrities and then a 30-minute ghost hunt afterward.

What I will say is that the venue for this ticketed event usually comes with some merit of the legitimacy of the alleged haunted location and I trust that the pros leading the investigation came up with more than substantial evidence.

20200212_125848
Stairs from the original Post Office. Currently, the lead to overtopping the exposed wall of Charles Town.

My Visit

Once paying for my ticket for the dungeon tour, I immediately head downstairs where my tour guide is about to begin. I already had my spirit box app running as well as my EVP digital recorder. The EMF detector was tucked away in a side pocket of my satchel so I could easily tell if any spikes would occur during my tour.

I will say that once I hit the stairs to the dungeon, the EMF detector was active throughout my entire tour of the dungeon. The erratic lights drew so much attention to other guests of the tour that I had to turn it to face me. The lights were not patterned as I was originally suspecting. With all of the hype of paranormal activity around this building, I was honestly expecting it to be rigged, hence why I took a daytime tour with the normal historian tourists.

20200212_125615
Photo by Nicholas McGirr

I reviewed the spirit box app list of words after my tour and was surprised by a number of words. For those of you that have taken one of my “Stories in the Cemetery” ghost hunting experiences, you know that I find that 60-75% of the words provided are bullshit. With this list from the Provost Dungeon, not so much.

Words and phrases like “commit”, “cruel”, “he is guilty”, “violation” were all common themes throughout the word list. Check out the full word list in the picture slides below.

The words “cruel” and “violation” came through right around the time my tour guide was describing the conditions of the dungeon. Women were kept with the men without privacy, rat infestations and of course water coming over the top of the bricks from 1702. All these conditions were in fact “cruel” and were likely a “violation” of standards for prisoners.

The word that stood out to me most was my own name about 16 minutes into the tour. Just the night before, I told one of my ghost hunting guests that I would visit the Old Exchange and he texted me later that day asking how my investigation went. I showed him the list and his reply brought clarity to my work here in Charleston. He said, “They know you by name?!” Ironically, they do. I was called out just 16 minutes of my entering the building and beginning my tour of the dungeon. I have never seen any variation of my name (Nick, Nicky, Nicholas) ever brought through the spirit box app previously.

Conclusion

Upon listening to the audio from the tour, I could only find one instance where I may have heard something paranormal, but the evidence is insubstantial at this point and not worth posting until I have it analyzed. Other than that, I am pleased with the erraticism of the EMF detector (which stopped after I left the building) and the array of words I received through the spirit box app.

20200212_125304

I have explored the city of Charleston with my EMF detector looking for new locations to take my guests. With each passing of the Old Exchange and Provost Dungeon, the EMF detector usually signals for me to look further. Sometimes it’s just a blip, other times it’s an erratic display of lights screaming to be heard. I encourage you to visit the Old Exchange and Provost Dungeon, find an EMF app (yes, they work, just not as sensitive) and see for yourself who might be lurking in the basement of this extremely creepy structure that holds onto so much history of our country.

More than just a Blog

This is episode 25 of the Stories in the Cemetery podcast.

E38: The Jennie Wade House, Gettysburg, PA Stories in the Cemetery

Head over to http://www.nicholasmcgirr.com to view the blog post with bonus sections. References used for this podcast episode: Find A Grave. (n.d.). Jennie Wade. Retrieved  from Find a Grave: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/1064/jennie-wade Joe’s Ghost. (2011). Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.  Retrieved from https://youtu.be/1-3govRv8nE Serfass, D. R. (2014, June 27). Remembering  Gettysburg. Retrieved from Time News Online:  https://www.tnonline.com/20140627/remembering-gettysburg/ Small, C. L. (2018). Jennie Wade of Gettysburg. Gettysburg: Gettysburg Publishing. Svehla, J. (2010, September 17). Ghost Adventures.  (Z. Bagan, Interviewer) Retrieved from https://youtu.be/vq3R_x_moCs The Jennie Wade House Museum. (n.d.). The Jennie Wade  House Self-Guided Tour Pamphlet. The Jennie Wade House. Women Behind These Walls. (n.d.). Women Behind  These Walls Pamphlet. Retrieved from YWCA Gettysburg:  https://www.ywcagettysburg.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/WBTW-brochure-2015.pdf — Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/storiesinthecemetery/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/storiesinthecemetery/support
  1. E38: The Jennie Wade House, Gettysburg, PA
  2. E37: The Flight 93 National Memorial
  3. E36: The SBox Ghost Scanner by Ghost Stop
  4. E35: Homage to Vincent Price
  5. E34: Three books to study Cartomancy

If you’d like to support this blog/podcast, you can always

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Stories in the Cemetery Tours

Whether you’re a local or someone on vacation, you can take an Interactive Ghost Hunting Experience tour with me through downtown Charleston. We’ll visit many haunted locations using real ghost hunting equipment and possibly discover new activity! What will you discover on your tour?

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A Piratey Powder Magazine?

With 307 years worth of history (as of the year 2020), the Powder Magazine has seen centuries worth of tragedies, restorations, and faces. Not to discount any previous work from historians, paranormal investigators or other Charleston fanatics, but to narrow down one of these elements and tie it to an alleged haunting has been quite the task.

A brief timeline of tragedies

Let’s get started with an overview of the history of the Powder Magazine to give you a scope of the historical timeline the building has suffered through.

  • Wars served:
    • Yamasee War
    • Tuscarora War
    • Stono Rebellion
    • King George’s War
    • French and Indian War
    • The Cherokee War
    • American Revolution
    • Civil War

Although the magazine wasn’t a major factor in all of the wars listed above, it did partake a role in some format.

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“Pirates and the First Revolution” Guide Panel

The Powder Magazine is said to be the oldest building in Charleston, SC being built in 1713. However, research shows that the Pink House on Chalmers street could date back as far as 1694 -1714. Regardless of which building is older, there is no doubt that The Powder Magazine has survived a much more tragic lifespan than that of the infamous Pink House.

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The Structure of the Building

There’s something to be said about the structure of the Powder Magazine and its lifespan. With 35-inch thick walls, sand in the attic and slate rooftop, the design was meant to contain any explosions from the gunpowder that resided here. I find the sand-filled lofted roof to be very interesting and the 307-year-old sand is still laid inside the loft. The nine pillars that make up this building were constructed in a groin-vault style. Along with the sand in the roof and groin-vault construction, this was meant to contain internal explosions and to shield the powder from enemy projectiles. The magazine could house up to five tons of black gunpowder.

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(The Old Powder Magazine, Cumberland Street)

Pirate History?

So, amidst all the wars served and survived, Charleston has had an attraction for our Pirates. Connected to the history of The Powder Magazine is that of Anne Bonny and Mary Read. Through any historical tour in Charleston (especially one based on the bloody scoundrels), you’ll hear stories of these pirate ladies along with Stede Bonnet and even Blackbeard himself. I’ve mentioned a bit about Bonnet and Blackbeard in my White Point Garden post.

Ghost stories and lore will tie the spirit of Anne Bonny to The Powder Magazine with alleged sightings and shadows.

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Bonny’s story is lacking details, to say the least. Just like the absent blueprints for the Powder Magazine, such is the written history of this female villainous pirate. Legend has it that Bonny, from Ireland, moved to the Carolinas with her father. It is said that her mother was a servant and Anne was born out of wedlock. Bonny’s defiance of authority led her to piracy where she married James Bonny, another pirate. She would soon leave James and meet up with Mary Read aboard the ship of Calico Jack, with whom she fell in love.

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Notice the groin-vaulted walls. Photo by Nicholas McGirr. Cannot be used without permission.

Upon being captured, both Mary Read and Anne Bonny claimed to be pregnant and were released. To this day, it is unsure if the two women went on to live the pirate life or if they settled and lived out their days with children at their feet.

I have no doubt that either of these two female pirates knew of The Powder Magazine or had raided its contents at one point in their piracy.

However…

In all the research for a tie to either pirate that is said to have had their spirits seen at the Powder Magazine could I find ANY tie to this historic building. I could find no pictures, video or any personal claims of persons visiting the Powder Magazine of such ghosts or haunting activity.

My Visit

I visited the Powder Magazine in the late afternoon just before their closing and told the staff why I was there: to research ghosts and paranormal activity. They welcomed me to do my research and then sold me a copy of the building’s history, The Arsenal of History by R. Alan Stello Jr. A fantastic read for this ghost enthusiast, I might add.

With my EMF detector running and spirit boxes gurgling out static, I took plenty of pictures and waited for any activity while touring the building and outside yard reading the guide panels and listening to other guests whisper to each other showing respect to the old building.

My EMF gave a “blip” (I should really define this one day) of just outside the green zone on occasion, but I couldn’t relate it to any other activity to the spirit boxes or specific location of an artifact inside the museum.

The Spirit box app, “Ghost Detector” gave me one word that stood out: “Writing”. I took this as I should really dive into the book I purchased as well as other research, in other words, the “writings” about the building would give me what I was looking for. Coincidental enough, I took the clue and ran with it.

The manual spirit box, spit out static and nothing else. Not even a whisper of any kind of activity came through this device.

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“The Walled City” guide panel.

So, I dove into the book, by Stello Jr. and read from cover to cover. Stopping at the Anne Bonny page, I read it over several times looking for any connection or tie into the Powder Magazine. Without a direct relation to Anne Bonny, Mary Read or any other pirate, I was baffled as to why she was even mentioned in a book strictly about the magazine and its history.

I dove into an online search looking for more about Bonny and her whereabouts in her life. Not one indication of historical videos, articles related to her history, or other experts on Bonny could I find any relation to the Powder Magazine. I researched evidence of sightings or shadows and came up with zilch.

In Conclusion

As a writer who needs evidence and physical proof of alleged hauntings, I have to say, the whole Anne Bonny and Mary Read correlation with the Powder Magazine feels more like a tourist trap attraction to liven up such a historical building. Let’s face it, when someone starts rattling off dates and war heroes, most of us get a little bored and/or if nothing else, a little confused about how things tie together. Throw a pirate into the mix after a few blockbuster hits with a big name actor and the history juices start flowing again with interest.

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The Powder Magazine and front yard. Photo by Nicholas McGirr. Cannot be used without permission.

I pass by the Powder Magazine on my Interactive Ghost Hunting Experience tours, mainly because I didn’t know much about the history of the building other than haunting “claims”. In the future, I will take my guests closer to the structure (it’s closed in the evenings) and do a bit more researching with gadgets we use on my tour. The Grid Pen will come in handy in this scenario as well as any thermal imaging from our camera.

In the event that any new evidence is found with an actual piece of evidence, this blog post and podcast episode will be updated with such evidence. For now, enjoy the legends and lore on other tours as they will heighten your attention to look closer at the history of Charleston, even if some of the stories are a stretch to attract attention.

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Photo by Nicholas McGirr. Cannot be used without permission.

More than just a Blog

This is episode 23 of the Stories in the Cemetery podcast.

E38: The Jennie Wade House, Gettysburg, PA Stories in the Cemetery

Head over to http://www.nicholasmcgirr.com to view the blog post with bonus sections. References used for this podcast episode: Find A Grave. (n.d.). Jennie Wade. Retrieved  from Find a Grave: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/1064/jennie-wade Joe’s Ghost. (2011). Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.  Retrieved from https://youtu.be/1-3govRv8nE Serfass, D. R. (2014, June 27). Remembering  Gettysburg. Retrieved from Time News Online:  https://www.tnonline.com/20140627/remembering-gettysburg/ Small, C. L. (2018). Jennie Wade of Gettysburg. Gettysburg: Gettysburg Publishing. Svehla, J. (2010, September 17). Ghost Adventures.  (Z. Bagan, Interviewer) Retrieved from https://youtu.be/vq3R_x_moCs The Jennie Wade House Museum. (n.d.). The Jennie Wade  House Self-Guided Tour Pamphlet. The Jennie Wade House. Women Behind These Walls. (n.d.). Women Behind  These Walls Pamphlet. Retrieved from YWCA Gettysburg:  https://www.ywcagettysburg.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/WBTW-brochure-2015.pdf — Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/storiesinthecemetery/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/storiesinthecemetery/support
  1. E38: The Jennie Wade House, Gettysburg, PA
  2. E37: The Flight 93 National Memorial
  3. E36: The SBox Ghost Scanner by Ghost Stop
  4. E35: Homage to Vincent Price
  5. E34: Three books to study Cartomancy

If you’d like to support this blog/podcast, you can always

Buy Me A Coffee

Stories in the Cemetery Tours

Whether you’re a local or someone on vacation, you can take an Interactive Ghost Hunting Experience tour with me through downtown Charleston. We’ll visit many haunted locations using real ghost hunting equipment and possibly discover new activity! What will you discover on your tour?

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References

Bartelme, Tony. “The true and false stories of Anne Bonny, pirate woman of the Caribbean.” 21 November 2018. Post and Courier. https://www.postandcourier.com/news/the-true-and-false-stories-of-anne-bonny-pirate-woman/article_e7fc1e2c-101d-11e8-90b7-9fdf20ba62f8.html. 29 January 2020.

National Park Service. “The Powder Magazine.” 15 February 2018. National Park Services. https://www.nps.gov/places/powder-magazine.htm. 29 January 2020.

Sandlapper Water Tours. “7 Spooky Charleston Ghost Stories to Get Those Goosebumps.” 21 March 2019. Sandlapper Water Tours. https://www.sandlappertours.com/7-spooky-charleston-ghost-stories-to-get-those-goosebumps/. 29 January 2020.

Stello Jr., R. Alan. Arsenal of History: The Powder Magazine of South Carolina. Charleston: History Press, 2013. print book.

The Old Powder Magazine, Cumberland Street. Charleston, 24 November 1860. https://lcdl.library.cofc.edu/lcdl/catalog/lcdl:281?tify={%22panX%22:0.489,%22panY%22:0.531,%22view%22:%22info%22,%22zoom%22:0.479}.

Traveler of Charleston. “6 Spookiest Places in Charleston.” 10 October 2017. Traveler of Charleston. https://travelerofcharleston.com/6-spookiest-places-charleston/. 29 January 2020.

Magnolia Cemetery

To listen to the accompanying podcast episode visit Stories in the Cemetery.

I’m not even going to pretend that I can cover the 130 acres of history that makeup Magnolia Cemetery. Normally, my posts will give you the history of a location before I dive into the paranormal activity. This post will give you some connections to my previous investigations.

Famous South Carolinians

Among the 35,000 burial sites at Magnolia Cemetery, lie 39 known famous South Carolinians that helped shape the history of both Charleston and South Carolina. Among this list of elites are politicians, writers, and soldiers. I will mention only a few of them here as they relate to my previous research. This is not to say that any of the others not mentioned here are any less important, but as a researcher and writer, I found it interesting that my previous investigations are linked closer to home.

William Bull

Although not listed among the 39 notable burials in Magnolia, I couldn’t help but notice on the map of the cemetery, in the upper left-hand corner, the name of “William Bull”.

Magnolia Map
Map of Magnolia Cemetery. Picture found on http://www.magnoliacemetery.net

If you recall, William Bull was the man who funded Old Sheldon Church, a study I did in 2019. You can find that post here: Spirit Shoes at Old Sheldon Church.

William Gilmore Simms

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Bust of William Gilmore Simms at White Point Garden, SC. Picture by Nicholas McGirr

Last week, I posted about White Point Gardens and the lack of hauntings there. If you recall, there was a picture of a bust of William Gilmore Simms in White Point Gardens. Simms was a poet and novelist and his list of works includes “The Yemassee” written in 1835. Simms was also pronounced the “best novelist that America produced” by Edgar Allan Poe, another well-known author who spent time in Charleston. As an author myself, I like to think that Simms and Poe spent time together conversing over war and hardships of the South. The time periods match closely enough that this could’ve been possible.

 

Josephine Lyons Scott Pinckney

A descendant of Eliza and Thomas Pinckney, Josephine is also buried in Magnolia Cemetery. Eliza Lucas Pinckney, if you recall my post on their mansion site, was the mother of our indigo plants here in Charleston. Not only did she discover the crop’s capabilities to rebound Charleston’s crops, but she also stood as the businesswoman who was able to create and sell the crop overseas. A pioneer paving the path for future women of Charleston, Eliza’s tenacity lived through Josephine.

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Ravenel Bridge in the background of Magnolia Cemetery. Picture by Nicholas McGirr. Cannot be used without permission.

Josephine was the founder of the Poetry Society of South Carolina, Josephine also played a key role in the preservation of the Holy City. Active in the literary community, she influenced the American Scenic and Historic Preservation Society through the restoration of Charleston buildings and neighborhoods.

The Hunley Crew

The men who served under Captain Horace L. Hunley and Lt. Dixon are also buried here at Magnolia. There are signs that lead you right to it, or you can use the map of the cemetery grounds.

Although I have no direct research of the Hunley and its crew, I have plans in the future to dive into this research and of course, visit the Hunley itself in hopes of learning more about the vessel, it’s missions and it’s men.

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The remains of the crew were buried here in 2004, after author Clive Cussler and his group, NUMA found the vessel with the remains and time-capsule like artifacts. The funeral and memorial service took place in White Point Gardens and in Magnolia Cemetery with a full honorary service to remember those heroes that were lost.

Feels like an art exhibit

Walking and driving through Magnolia Cemetery, one gets a feeling that they are not only stepping through time but quite possibly through lost craftsmanship. The style of memorials, statues, headstones, and incredible carvings is astonishing. So astonishing in fact, that there are numerous books with depictions of the grave markers. One that comes to mind and more recent is from Patrick Harwood, “In the Arms of Angels”.

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There are plenty of newer style headstones but the uniquity of this cemetery is the vast array of styles of carvings, tombs, and crypts spread throughout the large grounds. An appreciation of artistry and craftsmanship aren’t needed while exploring the grounds, because it will be provided. You can’t help but notice how many different types of stone there are throughout the cemetery.

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Paranormal Activity

It’s a cold January here in Charleston and I had to get in and out of my warmed car between research sessions in the cemetery. I mention this because with each step back into my car, the spirit box app would give me another warning of precaution. Words like “speed”, “coordinate” and “squeeze” came through. In other words, in my small car, I had to watch my “speed”, “coordinate” my next stop and “squeeze” through the thin dirt roads that lead you around the graves.

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The word “perception” also came through on the app around the same time I heard “picture” in the manual spirit box. This was telling me to change my “perception” in the “pictures” I was taking and so I used my selfie stick to raise the camera and get a fuller view of the grounds. I was hoping for anomalies to show themselves or even an orb, but research on my pictures found nothing.

Throughout my stay in the cemetery, I would get random “blips” from the EMF detector. Nothing too significant, just a little touch out of the green zone. I couldn’t recreate the data, nor was anyone answering my questions when talking out loud. At times, I’ll use the EMF detector to communicate.

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As I was driving towards the exit, passing by the land that honors the Confederates killed during the Civil War, the word “soldier” came through. I stopped, rolled down my window, and enjoyed my last moment of peace in the old cemetery.

This was a peaceful drive and walk, despite the cold weather, and my understanding of the grounds and those buried there are deepened, though not fulfilled.

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Picture by Nicholas McGirr. Cannot be used without permission.

Current Walks of the Grounds

There are activities that occur on the grounds to commemorate soldiers lost, ghost stories with more in-depth tales of the South Carolinians buried here, and to honor the deaths of those aboard the Hunley. The website for Magnolia Cemetery gives regular updates on happenings with the grounds as well as any updates to the property.

I’m sure this will not be my last tour of the old cemetery, as it holds many graves that need to be researched and preserved. As for this post, let this be the beginning and very broad scope of the importance this land on the banks of the Cooper River holds for Charleston.

I shall visit again, soon.

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Picture by Nicholas McGirr. Cannot be used without permission.

More than just a Blog

This is episode 22 of the Stories in the Cemetery podcast.

E38: The Jennie Wade House, Gettysburg, PA Stories in the Cemetery

Head over to http://www.nicholasmcgirr.com to view the blog post with bonus sections. References used for this podcast episode: Find A Grave. (n.d.). Jennie Wade. Retrieved  from Find a Grave: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/1064/jennie-wade Joe’s Ghost. (2011). Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.  Retrieved from https://youtu.be/1-3govRv8nE Serfass, D. R. (2014, June 27). Remembering  Gettysburg. Retrieved from Time News Online:  https://www.tnonline.com/20140627/remembering-gettysburg/ Small, C. L. (2018). Jennie Wade of Gettysburg. Gettysburg: Gettysburg Publishing. Svehla, J. (2010, September 17). Ghost Adventures.  (Z. Bagan, Interviewer) Retrieved from https://youtu.be/vq3R_x_moCs The Jennie Wade House Museum. (n.d.). The Jennie Wade  House Self-Guided Tour Pamphlet. The Jennie Wade House. Women Behind These Walls. (n.d.). Women Behind  These Walls Pamphlet. Retrieved from YWCA Gettysburg:  https://www.ywcagettysburg.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/WBTW-brochure-2015.pdf — Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/storiesinthecemetery/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/storiesinthecemetery/support
  1. E38: The Jennie Wade House, Gettysburg, PA
  2. E37: The Flight 93 National Memorial
  3. E36: The SBox Ghost Scanner by Ghost Stop
  4. E35: Homage to Vincent Price
  5. E34: Three books to study Cartomancy

If you’d like to support this blog/podcast, you can always

Buy Me A Coffee

Stories in the Cemetery Tours

Whether you’re a local or someone on vacation, you can take an Interactive Ghost Hunting Experience tour with me through downtown Charleston. We’ll visit many haunted locations using real ghost hunting equipment and possibly discover new activity! What will you discover on your tour?

toppng.com-book-now-button-831x287

References Used to Create this Post

Bulldog Tours. Spirits of Magnolia Cemetery Tour. n.d. https://www.bulldogtours.com/tours/the-spirits-of-magnolia-cemetery-tour/1. 23 January 2020.

Charleston Currents. HISTORY: Josephine Lyons Scott Pinckney. 23 November 2015. https://charlestoncurrents.com/2015/11/history-josephine-pinckney/. 23 January 2020.

City Walking Guide. Charleston. n.d. https://www.citywalkingguide.com/charleston/magnolia-cemetery. 23 January 2020.

Find A Grave. Famous Memorials in Magnolia Cemetery. n.d. https://www.findagrave.com/cemetery/70585/famous-memorials?page=1#sr-6719543. 23 January 2020.

Harwood, Patrick. In the Arms of Angels. Birds Eye Productions, 2014. Print Book.

Hunley.org. Hunley crew to “rest in peace, at last”. 6 May 2003. https://www.hunley.org/hunley-crew-to-rest-in-peace-at-last/. 23 January 2020.

Magnolia Cemetery. Magnolia Cemetery Blog. 16 August 2019. http://www.magnoliacemetery.net/. 23 January 2020.

SC Picture Project. Magnolia Cemetery. n.d. https://www.scpictureproject.org/charleston-county/magnolia-cemetery.html. 23 January 2020.

Wikipedia. William Gilmore Simms. n.d. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Gilmore_Simms. 23 January 2020.

Silence in White Point Gardens

With all the stories of ghosts, hauntings, boo-hags and paranormal activity, one cannot ignore the tales of White Point Gardens which adds pirates to all of our ghoulish tales.

I’ve been to White Point Gardens on multiple occasions while living here in Charleston, and for those occasions, it was of no importance other than to enjoy a water view with some fantastic architectural surroundings.  This last visit was different.

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Photo by Nicholas McGirr. Cannot be used without permission.

With paranormal activity tools in hand, I set off to learn more about the paranormal activity on these grounds. Let’s look into the historical nature of the grounds first.

The History/Legendary Tale

The haunting story comes from that of Stede Bonnet and his men. Bonnet, known as the “Gentleman Pirate” was a family man and wealthy landowner gone rogue in 1717. He purchased a ship, named it Revenge, as most ships were named in this piratey age. He recruited anywhere from 50-70 men depending on which article you read and set sail. His notion of becoming a pirate is unknown since he left his wife and children behind to set forth a career of crime and piracy. Some articles state he borrowed a sum worth $400,000 in current currency and was bound to pay it back. Others say he simply had a mental breakdown and went mad for piracy.

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Stede Bonnet. Image from NCpedia.org.

After meeting Edward “Blackbeard” Thatch (or Teach, depending on who you are chatting with), there was turmoil afoot as the pair went their separate ways after befriending each other for a brief time. It is said that Bonnet was after Blackbeard, but was caught by Colonel William Rhett in Cape Fear. Bonnet’s men forfeited themselves and were hung from the numerous trees in White Point Gardens. Several days later, Judge Nicholas Trott condemned Bonnet to hang as well. All, including Bonnet, after being hung for several days from the trees as a warning to all other pirates, were buried in a nearby marsh.

The tale you’ll hear around Charleston after knowing this in-depth history of Stede Bonnet and his fated men, is that you can hear the screams from the hanging men and sometimes see their faces in the leaves of the trees at night. Fantastic story, especially when you bait in the legendary Blackbeard.

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Photo by Nicholas McGirr. Cannot be used without permission.

Byron Preiss’s The Secret

As a treasure hunter for Byron’s treasure casque, I couldn’t help but notice the hype around White Point Gardens when beginning my research into the casque’s burial site. This is truly what brought my attention to the hauntings that are said to be at this location.

I have to say, to all of you treasure hunters out there looking for Byron’s casque, that White Point Gardens is definitely the wrong location.

There are clues like the fairy wings on the painting being “white tipped” and the “white point” on the clock, but I, as a fellow treasure casque hunter, feel these depictions on the painting were meant to merely bring us to a point of such interest as Charleston. The “white” depictions in the painting are just clues to the city.

Okay, phew, off my soapbox….back to White Point Gardens ghosts.

Memorials on the White Point Gardens Grounds

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U.S.S. Amberjack Memorial pays tribute to the 374 officers, 3131 men aboard these 52 named submarines from the U.S. Navy. These submarines aided in the success of World War II.
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Erected in 1954, this memorial pays tribute to those who passed away on the U.S.S. Hobson. All 176 men have a tile below the memorial with their home state.
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William Gilmore Simms. Charleston native author known as “The Antebellum South’s leading man of letters”.

Although there are only three dedications/memorials listed on this post, there are others to be seen. I’ll leave those up to you to find on this over 5 acres of beautiful landscape.

Paranormal Activity

Sometimes silence can be a beautiful thing, just not when you’re looking for paranormal activity. During my walk of these grounds, I used two spirit boxes; one digital app and a manual spirit box. I also used my EMF detector during my walk of these grounds. I took several pictures that you can see throughout this post.

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Not a Spirit Box.

The spirit boxes remained silent for over an hour with either complete static coming through the airwaves or no words coming through the digital app. The EMF detector stayed on green without so much as a blip into the next level. And the pictures you see were analyzed for anomalies and blurred specs of dust. I came up with nothing.

However, I have to look at this two ways. With the spirit boxes being “dead”, I have yet to have that happen where something didn’t come through, at least on the digital app. At White Point Gardens, it was an empty word list. Very odd indeed.

I visited in the middle of the afternoon with other visitors enjoying the breeze off the water and traffic whizzing by.

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Photo by Nicholas McGirr. Cannot be used without permission.

After researching more about “what” the paranormal activity is said to have been experienced here, I realized, perhaps I should’ve visited closer to the evening hours. The alleged activity is to see the pirates faces in the trees and hear their screams to avenge their executions. Perhaps the silence I experienced was due to the time of day?

I, like many other ghostly tale tour guides, give my tours/experiences at night to add to the effect of the stories being told. I often tell my business partner, Brian McFarland that “ghosts don’t care what time of day it is.” Perhaps with White Point, I am dead wrong?

My Conclusion

After all the ghost hunting I’ve done on the streets of Charleston and with actual evidence, I have to say that the stories of White Point Gardens are just that: stories. I can admit that the lure of adding a pirate to a ghost story will bring us closer to learning about the history of Charleston. But even researching the history of Bonnet and his men, the story changed over time from different articles. Who’s to say it hasn’t completely become a tourist trap story like that of Blackbeard’s treasure being buried beneath the street leading from the Pirate House to Dock Street Theatre?

I’m going to call it as I see it at this point and claim that White Point Gardens is not actually haunted by paranormal activity. In this case, I would need proof of pirate faces in photographs and/or audio evidence for myself. In the near future, I will continue to visit this site for its beauty, but I always keep my paranormal activity kit nearby for more testing.

In the event, I prove myself wrong, I will be the first to admit. But for now, when you’re taking your “ghost tours” downtown and you hear this story, know you’ve been pulled in for a pirate story to liven up Charleston history. Enjoy the story as the storytellers tell it, it’s a great tale.

To read a full story of Stede Bonnet and his encounter with Blackbeard, I recommend visiting the Smithsonian website.

More than just a Blog

This is episode 21 of the Stories in the Cemetery podcast.

E38: The Jennie Wade House, Gettysburg, PA Stories in the Cemetery

Head over to http://www.nicholasmcgirr.com to view the blog post with bonus sections. References used for this podcast episode: Find A Grave. (n.d.). Jennie Wade. Retrieved  from Find a Grave: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/1064/jennie-wade Joe’s Ghost. (2011). Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.  Retrieved from https://youtu.be/1-3govRv8nE Serfass, D. R. (2014, June 27). Remembering  Gettysburg. Retrieved from Time News Online:  https://www.tnonline.com/20140627/remembering-gettysburg/ Small, C. L. (2018). Jennie Wade of Gettysburg. Gettysburg: Gettysburg Publishing. Svehla, J. (2010, September 17). Ghost Adventures.  (Z. Bagan, Interviewer) Retrieved from https://youtu.be/vq3R_x_moCs The Jennie Wade House Museum. (n.d.). The Jennie Wade  House Self-Guided Tour Pamphlet. The Jennie Wade House. Women Behind These Walls. (n.d.). Women Behind  These Walls Pamphlet. Retrieved from YWCA Gettysburg:  https://www.ywcagettysburg.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/WBTW-brochure-2015.pdf — Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/storiesinthecemetery/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/storiesinthecemetery/support
  1. E38: The Jennie Wade House, Gettysburg, PA
  2. E37: The Flight 93 National Memorial
  3. E36: The SBox Ghost Scanner by Ghost Stop
  4. E35: Homage to Vincent Price
  5. E34: Three books to study Cartomancy

If you’d like to support this blog/podcast, you can always

Buy Me A Coffee

Stories in the Cemetery Tours

Whether you’re a local or someone on vacation, you can take an Interactive Ghost Hunting Experience tour with me through downtown Charleston. We’ll visit many haunted locations using real ghost hunting equipment and possibly discover new activity! What will you discover on your tour?

toppng.com-book-now-button-831x287

Swamp Fox Ghost Town

Taking a step back in time is a normal activity for Charlestonians and tourists alike. However, this hidden gem of history is located outside of Charleston in Summerville, South Carolina. What remains of the Colonial Dorchester Site are tales left to be told of how early settlers in the area lived and eventually vanished after the Revolutionary War.

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Inside the bell tower. Photo by Nicholas McGirr

The Structures

The first thing anyone would notice as you pull in to this park is the remains of the St. George Bell Tower. Erected before 1756, the bell tower was burned by the British during the Revolutionary War. It held four bells in it’s prime and was slightly repaired after the torture of being burned. What remains today is a scope of historical architecture for all to observe.

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Burned bell tower of St. George’s Church. Photo from Art of Charleston
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Repaired bell tower of St. George’s Church. Photo by Nicholas McGirr

Towards the back of the park next to the Ashley River is a tabby fort with walls made of oyster shells and concrete. Today, this is the best-kept display of tabby in America even though it was damaged during the earthquake of 1886.

Inside the fort walls are the remains of a powder house where Francis “Swamp Fox” Marion was stationed. The remains are preserved by keeping visitors from climbing or damaging the remaining structure. Along the Ashley River, the park has set up benches and tables for fishermen and for those wishing to enjoy a very peaceful lunch. At low tide, you can observe the wharf and dock that was once used in this colonial society.

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Photo taken by Nicholas McGirr

Behind the church, you can stroll through the base structures of homes and the school that was located there complete with informational panels to guide you. There were even street signs still visible, their date is unknown.

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The History

With the site once thriving with homes, two schools and a church, where did everyone go? I’ll keep it simple.

During the Revolutionary War, many settlers began to flee the area after many of the structures were burned. These areas included parts of Georgia and further south to avoid another raid in the area. By 1788, the entire town was abandoned leaving it to become a ghost town.

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Photo taken by Nicholas McGirr

During the war, it was Francis “Swamp Fox” Marion and Thomas Sumter that were stationed at the site to guard the powder magazine. The remnants of the magazine can be seen today in the middle of the fort walls.

During my research, I found no reported deaths or tragedies on the area which left me curious as to find any paranormal activity on the grounds.

The Data

It was on the bell tower that I first received EMF readings, but after several visits to the site, I have never been able to recreate the readings. Even with a small cemetery nearby (at least what’s visible as a cemetery), there are absolutely no EMF readings, cold spots or spirit box activity of any kind. Even the app that I normally use to accompany the actual spirit box gave random answers and words while investigating this site. None of the terms and words that came from the app could be linked to the site.

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Photo taken by Nicholas McGirr

This ghost town is just a town abandoned. Even though I was able to find a slight EMF detection near the bell tower, I was unable to recreate it. This tells me two things: First, any hauntings that are at this site do not wish to be found. Second, that this was once the home to many of our early settlers doesn’t mean it will hold onto the residual spirit activity.

The intent for my research is to not just investigate the famously haunted locations but to find new locations that may not have been discovered as having activity. The Colonial Dorchester site is not one of those locations. What I did get out of this investigation is a furthered understanding of the Charleston history which may tie into future investigations later. This is a good thing.

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Photo of the tabby fort walls at Fort Dorchester. Photo from Art of Charleston.

So even though I found no paranormal activity, to keep my integrity as an author and researcher, I presented this investigation anyway. Not all investigations are going to be a success, but with the history attached to the Colonial Dorchester site, I am claiming success on what I’ve learned to further understand how our ancestors lived before us.

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Parish Church of St. George. Photo taken by Nicholas McGirr

I recommend you visit this site for yourself to not only see the tabby walls but to get a feel for how our ancestors before us would have created a community.

More than just a Blog

This is episode 15 of the Stories in the Cemetery podcast.

E38: The Jennie Wade House, Gettysburg, PA Stories in the Cemetery

Head over to http://www.nicholasmcgirr.com to view the blog post with bonus sections. References used for this podcast episode: Find A Grave. (n.d.). Jennie Wade. Retrieved  from Find a Grave: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/1064/jennie-wade Joe’s Ghost. (2011). Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.  Retrieved from https://youtu.be/1-3govRv8nE Serfass, D. R. (2014, June 27). Remembering  Gettysburg. Retrieved from Time News Online:  https://www.tnonline.com/20140627/remembering-gettysburg/ Small, C. L. (2018). Jennie Wade of Gettysburg. Gettysburg: Gettysburg Publishing. Svehla, J. (2010, September 17). Ghost Adventures.  (Z. Bagan, Interviewer) Retrieved from https://youtu.be/vq3R_x_moCs The Jennie Wade House Museum. (n.d.). The Jennie Wade  House Self-Guided Tour Pamphlet. The Jennie Wade House. Women Behind These Walls. (n.d.). Women Behind  These Walls Pamphlet. Retrieved from YWCA Gettysburg:  https://www.ywcagettysburg.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/WBTW-brochure-2015.pdf — Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/storiesinthecemetery/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/storiesinthecemetery/support
  1. E38: The Jennie Wade House, Gettysburg, PA
  2. E37: The Flight 93 National Memorial
  3. E36: The SBox Ghost Scanner by Ghost Stop
  4. E35: Homage to Vincent Price
  5. E34: Three books to study Cartomancy

If you’d like to support this blog/podcast, you can always

Buy Me A Coffee

Stories in the Cemetery Tours

Whether you’re a local or someone on vacation, you can take an Interactive Ghost Hunting Experience tour with me through downtown Charleston. Even though we won’t trek up to Summerville to visit the Colonial Dorchester site, we’ll visit many haunted locations using real ghost hunting equipment and possibly discover new activity! What will you discover on your tour?

toppng.com-book-now-button-831x287

References Used to write this post

City of Charleston. Art Work of Charleston: Published in 12 Parts. W. H. Parish Publishing Co., 1893. https://lcdl.library.cofc.edu/lcdl/catalog/lcdl:129214?tify={%22panX%22:0.449,%22panY%22:0.964,%22view%22:%22info%22,%22zoom%22:1.393}.

South Carolina Picture Project. Colonial Dorchester, Summerville, SC. Updated 2019. https://www.scpictureproject.org/dorchester-county/fort-dorchester.html. 28 November 2019.

South Carolina State Parks. Colonial Dorchester State Historic Site. 2019. https://southcarolinaparks.com/colonial-dorchester. 28 November 2019.

Charleston’s Old Jail

With three different trips to Charleston’s Old Jail, the evidence is substantial to say it is truly haunted.

The Old Charleston Jail is the final home to Lavinia and John Fisher. Lavinia was known as America’s first serial killer and it is questionable whether her husband, John, was involved with the murders she was charged with.

If you’ve been following this blog, you’ll know that we were using apps for smartphones to aid in our investigations. Our third and final trip to the old jail, we used a K-II EMF reader, a voice recorder as well as an actual spirit box. With my team in tow, we each had a device we were in charge of and the results almost matched what we caught with the smartphone apps.

To elaborate, an EMF reader detects an electromagnetic field near a specific area. We tested the reader around our home with a spike around surge protectors with multiple electronics plugged in. The spirit box uses radio waves to randomly spit out words as it scans through each individual radio signal. The voice recorder was so we could record any words that came out of the spirit box by saying them out loud.

The front gates of the old jail gave us plenty of words with the smartphone app along with some strong EMF signals. One of the words that came through the app was “chair” and after some research, I found that there is an old wheelchair inside the jail that is said to be haunted all on its own. Feel free to check out the “Links” section below to watch a YouTube video that discusses this chair.

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Also, during the first and second visits, quite a few names came through the app. It wasn’t something we were expecting, but there was a definitive pattern.

Please keep in mind that we did not take the interior tour, all three of these visits were simply by walking around the building. We did not want to be influenced by tourist attractions that speak of the legends, we wanted to remain in the dark.

With our last and final trip using everything but our smartphones, we found a few hot spots with our EMF reader where one of the team members felt dizzy and a bit disoriented. We tested this by removing ourselves from that area and then returning to the exact area. I also wanted to note that is was approximately 50 feet away from the building, in the parking area. The EMF spiked and remained there until we walked away leaving one of my team members feeling disoriented. Here’s a pic of the EMF detector:

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EMF Detector spiking near the back steps of the Old Charleston Jail.
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Another hot spot with the EMF reader was at the bottom of the stairs that sits behind the building. I climbed the stairs to catch a stronger signal, but it was only at the bottom of the stairs where the meter spiked. No disorientation from any team member occurred.

As for the spirit box, over 40 phrases came through our hour-long walk around the building. Phrases like “It’s an accident”, “July 20th”, and “Free the cannon”. I was unable to find a connection to any of these phrases, but “July 20th” sticks out in my mind and I plan on investigating further in the downtown Charleston library where the records are kept from all inmates who entered and served time in the old jail. Perhaps a second post/podcast episode will be in order with my findings.

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One other phrase stands out; “Why John?” came through about 20 minutes into our tour. This could refer to the questionable involvement of John Fisher, (Lavinia’s husband) with the murders he was charged with. It is said that John Fisher before his death wanted to address the public and apologize for any wrongdoings he may have caused. Lavinia, on the other hand, did nothing of the sort.

Names that came through the spirit box app: “Kennedy”, “James”, and “Madison”. Notice how all could be first or last names.

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Names that came through the physical spirit box: “Why John?”, “Father Morgan” and “South Carolina”.  I mention “South Carolina” here only because that’s five syllables that were able to come through during a speedy search of radio signals by the device.

Overall, the disorientation of team members, the spikes of EMF outside the building and the terms that came through the spirit box(es), I can conclude that there is something residual staying at the Old Charleston Jail. With the other phrases that came through, I can also conclude that someone or many someones are trying to clear up any urban legends that are surrounding the mystique of the long-standing building.

There are plenty of resources I will need to investigate before making a second post about the Old Charleston Jail,. As for now, if you have any connections to the aforementioned terms, please reach out to me. I would love to hear your take on the Old Charleston Jail and its mysteries.

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More than just a Blog

This is episode 11 of the Stories in the Cemetery podcast.

E38: The Jennie Wade House, Gettysburg, PA Stories in the Cemetery

Head over to http://www.nicholasmcgirr.com to view the blog post with bonus sections. References used for this podcast episode: Find A Grave. (n.d.). Jennie Wade. Retrieved  from Find a Grave: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/1064/jennie-wade Joe’s Ghost. (2011). Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.  Retrieved from https://youtu.be/1-3govRv8nE Serfass, D. R. (2014, June 27). Remembering  Gettysburg. Retrieved from Time News Online:  https://www.tnonline.com/20140627/remembering-gettysburg/ Small, C. L. (2018). Jennie Wade of Gettysburg. Gettysburg: Gettysburg Publishing. Svehla, J. (2010, September 17). Ghost Adventures.  (Z. Bagan, Interviewer) Retrieved from https://youtu.be/vq3R_x_moCs The Jennie Wade House Museum. (n.d.). The Jennie Wade  House Self-Guided Tour Pamphlet. The Jennie Wade House. Women Behind These Walls. (n.d.). Women Behind  These Walls Pamphlet. Retrieved from YWCA Gettysburg:  https://www.ywcagettysburg.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/WBTW-brochure-2015.pdf — Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/storiesinthecemetery/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/storiesinthecemetery/support
  1. E38: The Jennie Wade House, Gettysburg, PA
  2. E37: The Flight 93 National Memorial
  3. E36: The SBox Ghost Scanner by Ghost Stop
  4. E35: Homage to Vincent Price
  5. E34: Three books to study Cartomancy

RESOURCES and LINKS

YouTube video: Wheelchair

If you’d like to support this blog/podcast, you can always Buy Me A Coffee to keep me fueled and ready for more investigations. Your contributions to my craft are always appreciated!

Hauntings at Fort Fremont Preserve

Welcome first time visitors and followers! I’m Nicholas McGirr, Author of the Afterlife and you’ve landed on another blog post of haunted stuff. This blog (and podcast) is intended to entertain you with my research on haunted locations for inspiring my fiction works. I hope you enjoy another adventure with me! Read on for this week’s post on Fort Fremont Preserve in Beaufort, South Carolina.

Finding the location

Finding another location to investigate after my time at Old Sheldon Church was a fairly easy decision. Looking through online haunting catalogs (I love shopping for new haunts!), I found little information about the Fort Fremont Preserve, even though it is listed as one of the hauntings in Beaufort, South Carolina.

With this investigation, I was accompanied by April (my wife) and a third person to help manage the use of equipment while I handled Byron, my dappled dachshund.

The beach is surreal

It was late afternoon when we arrived. Our GPS didn’t take us to the front gates of the Preserve and we had to walk around the gated area through a beach to find a way in. There was a much easier way to enter the preserve, but we found it even more interesting to have to pass through a very small segregated beach area. There was no one on the beach, but the waves crashing in were calming. The beach made the entire area feel surreal and the eerie factor crept up on us as we kept exploring.

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Using a Spirit Box app

Like our visit to Old Sheldon Church, I wanted to explore the possibilities of a Spirit Box App. A spirit box uses radio frequencies or white noise (static) to allow spirits to communicate. If you’ve watched ghost hunting television shows, it’s the static box that spits out words.

The app we chose is called “Ghost Detector”, and it was chosen for the cheesey name. My thought behind the app is that it is intended for party games or hoaxes on friends. Nonetheless, it provides white noise and will keep a tally of words it thinks come through with the abled frequency settings.

Without having a psychic with me, or Psychic himself from my previous investigations, I found that I needed words or phrases to investigate through research. The “Ghost Detector” app was readily available, fun, and well, free.

I wasn’t sure what was going to come out of using the app, but I did notice that in both locations, Old Sheldon Church and Fort Fremont Preserve, that the words came through much quicker than when I tested the app in my home.

A brief history of Fort Fremont

This fort was one of six forts intended for the Spanish-American War. It was built in 1889 and then abandoned by 1910. It housed three disappearing canons, two of which were given to France during WWI and the other sent to New Jersey. To date, it is known that all three canons were scrapped.

This fort was never under attack nor was it used in the Spanish-American War. It housed approximately 110 soldiers which took care of the facilities that included a commissary, a bakery, a hospital and many other buildings. Overall, the entire fort area covered more than seventy acres of land. All to protect Beaufort from threats of the Spanish-American War.

The Haunted Claims

There are many haunting claims of this area including those of Land’s End which sits where the original fort would have extended.

It is said that there was a fight on the Fort Fremont grounds between soldiers and local African-Americans over moonshine. All survived but one: Pvt. Frank J. Quigley. It is also said that this soldier had intimate relations with a local’s wife and that’s how he died. Who’s to say? None of us were there.

This leads to the haunting of Land’s End Light, where it is said that if you drive to the end of the road near the beach that you will see a lantern swinging. Locals claim it is Pvt. Quigley.

Other claims on the Fort Fremont Preserve are of EVP’s (electronic voice phenomenon) or of smoky images that seem like spirits.

One YouTube video shows a couple investigating with a Spirit Box app similar to the one I used. The words that came through their app were much different than that of what came through my phone. They had words like “chemical”, “No one”, “Spirit”, “Charles” and “This is one”. Towards the end of the video the woman claims that the spirit box answered her questions by using her name.

All of these stories were just creepy enough for me to want to visit for myself.

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Headaches

Upon the arrival while my team and I walking through the beach area, I began to get a migraine. I’ve had a history of migraines, but hadn’t had one in quite some time, I pushed on so I could discover the grounds.

As I did, the headache grew stronger as I got closer to the fort until finally I had to come to a stop once we reached the front of the fort with the cavernous openings. I had to sit down, my eye was watering to the point I couldn’t see and I had sweat pouring down my brow and neck.

My team checked on me as I sat down. Byron stayed with me as April took a few photos and the Spirit Box app was running picking up a few words before I decided I couldn’t handle the headache any longer.

April had to help me to the car since the migraine behind my eye was causing it to strain and water profusely. Once we reached the car, the headache eased slowly, my eye stopped watering and the sweating seemed to come to an end. After 20 minutes, I was able to drive us home.

I tell you about my migraine due to a connection in my research. Keep reading…

Spirit Box Findings

Now we come to the cheesey Spirit Box, “Ghost Detector” and the words it gave me for research. I was able to connect the history of the Fort Fremont area with six out of the nine words it recorded. Not too shabby for a free app.

screenshot_20190415-165319_ghost-detector

The only three words not connected to this area: “January”, “Warrior” and “Tea”.  But let’s work backwards on this list to see the connections.

Three: I connected this term to the three canons that were stationed at the fort.

Friends: There is an organization called “Friends of Fort Fremont” that preserves the land and educates on the history of Fort Fremont. Also, notice there are “three” F’s in their title.

Soldiers: This one is pretty obvious as there were over 100 soldiers stationed at Fort Fremont.

Now, I’m going to tie a story together for the words, “Raid”, “Weak” and “Rocks”.

Going further into the history of this land, it is known that Harriet Tubman led a raid of Col. Montgomery’s men to the Combahee River (just across from Rock Creek) to weaken the  rebel’s Army camp and freed over 700 slaves in June of 1863.

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Scenes in the Life of Harriet Tubman, pgs 85-6

The area that Harriet Tubman started this raid was near the grounds where Fort Fremont currently stands. I looked into the maps of these areas to show where the Combahee River and Rock Creek are in relation to Fort Fremont. You can see Fort Fremont on the bottom left of the map, Combahee River with the Red pin and Rock Creek in the very top right corner.

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Google Map of Fort Fremont, Combahee River and Rock Creek

Dear Reader, I would love to be convinced that the legendary Harriet Tubman came through on a free app used for a game. But I needed more clues.

I found that Tubman suffered from migraines and seizures throughout her life due to a riot that happened when she was just a girl. These migraines and seizures were spiritual for her as she grew closer to her religious values.

Final Conclusion

My overall conclusion is that similar to Litchfield Plantation. I went in expecting one haunting, but through research was able to dig up a whole other history. This experience for me went further than just a history lesson, it became personal. The migraine I felt during this investigation was intense and I felt that it had something to do with the property at Fort Fremont.

I want to know your thoughts on the matter:

Do you feel that deeper histories arise when researching a haunted location?

Have you had an experience at Fort Fremont?

Tell me your ghost story and we’ll compare notes. Be sure to leave your comments below.

Don’t forget to sign up for my newsletter to get wind of when my blog posts and podcast episodes are published and you’ll get a FREE audio book of my novelette, The Life Tree.

I’m a writer, and now you know another story that inspires my fiction. Thanks for reading,

Nick.

More than just a Blog

This is episode 9 of the Stories in the Cemetery podcast.

E38: The Jennie Wade House, Gettysburg, PA Stories in the Cemetery

Head over to http://www.nicholasmcgirr.com to view the blog post with bonus sections. References used for this podcast episode: Find A Grave. (n.d.). Jennie Wade. Retrieved  from Find a Grave: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/1064/jennie-wade Joe’s Ghost. (2011). Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.  Retrieved from https://youtu.be/1-3govRv8nE Serfass, D. R. (2014, June 27). Remembering  Gettysburg. Retrieved from Time News Online:  https://www.tnonline.com/20140627/remembering-gettysburg/ Small, C. L. (2018). Jennie Wade of Gettysburg. Gettysburg: Gettysburg Publishing. Svehla, J. (2010, September 17). Ghost Adventures.  (Z. Bagan, Interviewer) Retrieved from https://youtu.be/vq3R_x_moCs The Jennie Wade House Museum. (n.d.). The Jennie Wade  House Self-Guided Tour Pamphlet. The Jennie Wade House. Women Behind These Walls. (n.d.). Women Behind  These Walls Pamphlet. Retrieved from YWCA Gettysburg:  https://www.ywcagettysburg.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/WBTW-brochure-2015.pdf — Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/storiesinthecemetery/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/storiesinthecemetery/support
  1. E38: The Jennie Wade House, Gettysburg, PA
  2. E37: The Flight 93 National Memorial
  3. E36: The SBox Ghost Scanner by Ghost Stop
  4. E35: Homage to Vincent Price
  5. E34: Three books to study Cartomancy

 If you’d like to support this blog/podcast, you can always Buy Me A Coffee to keep me fueled and ready for more investigations. Your contributions to my craft are always appreciated!

Spirit Shoes at Old Sheldon Church

The Grounds

In Beaufort, South Carolina sits the serene and very still ruins of The Old Sheldon Church. Originally named Prince William’s Parish Church, the site holds gorgeous oak trees, randomly scattered headstones/graves and the remains of a twice destroyed Georgian style place of worship.

What better place to find supernatural happenings than a building that was destroyed twice?

Originally built in the 1740’s and 1750’s, the contributor who funded the church was that of William Bull whose grave is still on the grounds, allegedly. He was married to Ann Bull, and it was the stories of his wife, Ann, that led me to this visit.

There are stories online of a lady in a brown dress guarding the grave of her child. The gender of the child she’s protected is unknown by the headstone, but research states Mr. & Mrs. Bull had only one child. I mention this because of some of the research conducted on site later.

Old Sheldon Marker
Stone marker connected to outside church wall. Photo courtesy of April McGirr.

Once Loved, Twice Burned

According to www.scriptureproject.org, the history goes like this:

Originally organized and funded in the 1740s and 1750s by William Bull, whose Newberry Plantation bordered church grounds, … The church was set on fire in 1779 by British troops led by General Augustine Prevost during the Revolutionary War. 

Tradition states that on January 14, 1865, near the end of the Civil War, General Sherman’s troops burned the church a second time as part of his “March to the Sea” campaign… In a letter dated February 3, 1866, …, Milton Leverett wrote that “Sheldon Church not burn’t. Just torn up in the inside, but can be repaired.” “

So, there it is. Destroyed twice in two different wars: The Revolutionary War and then the Civil War. It is a possibility that the materials inside the church were stolen by locals to repair their own homes during the Civil War, but the church was destroyed nonetheless.

There is no doubt that between both of these vandalizing acts of war, that death occurred on the grounds of the church.

My Visit

Our visit to this location was one of two locations that day. We visited the Old Sheldon Church in the early afternoon. There were others there also visiting the site, taking pictures and the site remains open to the public to visit the history of South Carolina without a cost or a tour guide.

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Taken from behind the remains of Old Sheldon Church. The crypt of William Bull. Photo courtesy of April McGirr.

As said earlier, the grounds are covered with plenty of mossy oaks, some with cement blocks in them to retain the strength of the trees. The air is quiet and very still in this place as it sits in the backwoods of a very old South Carolinian city. It is exactly as you would suspect.

Some new testing

For our day in Beaufort, I decided I wanted to test a spirit box app and an EMF detecting app from my phone.

A spirit box uses radio frequencies to allow spirits to communicate. The app I found is called “Ghost Detector”. And yes, I chose it for the clichéd name. I tested this app at home first, playing with the features and waiting for anything to come through. At random intervals, it spits out a word. It seemed pretty bogus at the time, but thought I would give this a try at an actual haunted location. After all, according to the technology, a spirit simply needs the right frequency to communicate. Who cared if the app I was using was a hoax? It still provided random frequencies and that’s what the spirits needed.

I also want to point out that when toying with this app at home, the words came across my screen about every 5-10 minutes. While at Old Sheldon Church, the words came much faster.

The EMF (electromagnetic field) detector was also tested at home. Electromagnetic Fields are said to determine whether there is spirit activity nearby.

I walked around my home placing my phone around electrical outlets and electronic items and it actually worked! I don’t know how my phone is able to do this through an app, but I went with the proof of little lights on my screen lighting up.

**(Note that while I used the EMF detecting app at Old Sheldon Church, there was no activity to be documented.)

I brought a third person with me to handle my phone with these new apps. April (my wife) was taking pictures as usual. Byron and I walked around reading as many headstones as we could find and the third person was gauging the apps letting me know which words were coming through the “Ghost Detector” app.

Shoes at the Church

As we were all exploring the grounds, the app was spitting out random words that made no sense. Like my investigations with Psychic, I thought these words might make more sense with research.  Take a look at these screenshots:

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Notice that there was a word coming through every 1-3 minutes. This is more activity than I had at home.

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Now take a look at this screenshot. This is from the same location, you can tell by the timeframes.

See the word “SHOES”? Yeah, I thought the same thing; stupid. I originally began researching these words with “RANDY” in mind since it came up twice. I found nothing. Even on the gravesite listing on www.graveyard.com did I find anyone, even a middle name, of Randy.

What I did find was section from the book, “Wicked Beaufort” by Alexia Jones Helsey. Here’s the section:

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Jones Helsley, A. (2011). Yamassee War. In Wicked Beaufort. History Press Library Editions.

“SHOES” doesn’t seem so stupid now does it?

Arbitrary Headstones

This leaves me to wonder if these apps that are built to be hoaxes or just for fun can actually be useful. The “Ghost Detector” app seems like a hoax with the weird sound effects and the cheesey pixelated screen, but it gave me proof that someone was there. All the other clues listed like “MY SON”, “FIND HIM” and “RANDY” all seem relevant too, but I wasn’t able to find any research to justify any of these phrases.

I wanted to note that with all the 75 headstones in Old Sheldon Church, most of them seemed to be broken, cracked, sinking, or had some other type of vandalization. I can’t help but wonder if this was done by actual vandals or if the graves were moved from their original burials. The headstones were randomly placed as well. In other words, unless you are part of one of these families, the reasoning behind the arbitrary placement of these graves is uncertain.

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Randomly placed headstones at Old Sheldon Churchyard. Photo courtesy of April McGirr.

Conclusive Evidence

With the end of our visit to Old Sheldon, I concluded that the grounds are indeed haunted. After the research and the common term of “SHOES” and the story from “Wicked Beaufort”, I have to say, I can see the connection.

Other words that came through the “Ghost Detector” app are inconclusive at this point, but may shine through with another visit to this location later. But for now, I’m convinced that there are those from beyond the grave trying to speak to us at Old Sheldon.

As always, let me know your thoughts below. Have you visited this site? Have you had an experience? Sometimes that experience doesn’t come to light until later.

This week’s book sponsor is “The Umbrella Tree” by Nicholas McGirr. Be sure to check out this title on Amazon or you can read about it here: The Umbrella Tree.

More than just a Blog

This is episode 8 of the Stories in the Cemetery podcast.

E38: The Jennie Wade House, Gettysburg, PA Stories in the Cemetery

Head over to http://www.nicholasmcgirr.com to view the blog post with bonus sections. References used for this podcast episode: Find A Grave. (n.d.). Jennie Wade. Retrieved  from Find a Grave: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/1064/jennie-wade Joe’s Ghost. (2011). Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.  Retrieved from https://youtu.be/1-3govRv8nE Serfass, D. R. (2014, June 27). Remembering  Gettysburg. Retrieved from Time News Online:  https://www.tnonline.com/20140627/remembering-gettysburg/ Small, C. L. (2018). Jennie Wade of Gettysburg. Gettysburg: Gettysburg Publishing. Svehla, J. (2010, September 17). Ghost Adventures.  (Z. Bagan, Interviewer) Retrieved from https://youtu.be/vq3R_x_moCs The Jennie Wade House Museum. (n.d.). The Jennie Wade  House Self-Guided Tour Pamphlet. The Jennie Wade House. Women Behind These Walls. (n.d.). Women Behind  These Walls Pamphlet. Retrieved from YWCA Gettysburg:  https://www.ywcagettysburg.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/WBTW-brochure-2015.pdf — Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/storiesinthecemetery/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/storiesinthecemetery/support
  1. E38: The Jennie Wade House, Gettysburg, PA
  2. E37: The Flight 93 National Memorial
  3. E36: The SBox Ghost Scanner by Ghost Stop
  4. E35: Homage to Vincent Price
  5. E34: Three books to study Cartomancy

If you’d like to support this blog/podcast, you can always Buy Me A Coffee to keep me fueled and ready for more investigations. Your contributions to my craft are always appreciated!